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Food Irradiation Updates

  
Published by Ronald F. Eustice on behalf of the Food Irradiation Processing Alliance (FIPA) and the International Irradiation Association (iiA).
May  2013
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Food Irradiation Update is published monthly by Ronald F. Eustice who is a food quality & safety assurance consultant based in Minneapolis. He can be reached at: reustice@gmail.com and at 612.202.1016.
 
Quotable Quotes:
"Irradiation is a vital tool to protect New Zealand's vulnerable horticulture industry from fruit fly and we support its use on at-risk produce from Australia," Alasdair MacLeod, chair of Tomatoes New Zealand. 
 
"Irradiated fruit can pave the way for tree-ripened mangoes in the U.S. market." 
Roger Gay, chief executive officer, Cocanmex, Cuautitlan Izcalli, Mexico. 
 
"With irradiation technology, litchi can be preserved up to 48 days. Normally, the small luscious fruits are destroyed in three days. Similarly, Jardalu mango from the Bhagalpur area (of India) can be preserved for 10 to 15 days against the usual three to four days. 
M.L. Chaudhary, Vice-chancellor, Bihar Agriculture University, Sabour, India
IN THIS ISSUE
Canadian Cattlemen's Association revives petition for Canada beef irradiation
Irradiation process lets Cocanmex ship quality fruit to U.S.
Irradiation to increase shelf life of India fruit
Irradiated Tomatoes from Australia to New Zealand by June
Dangers of Mechanically Tenderized Beef; Consumer Reports
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
QUICK LINKS
Canadian Cattlemen's Association revives petition for Canada beef irradiation; (April 24, 2013): 
CALGARY, Alberta - The Canadian Cattlemen's Association (CCA) announced it will submit paperwork to Health Canada to reactivate the process for approving beef irradiation in Canada.
The group first submitted the petition in 1998, but final steps were not completed.

"The recent support of irradiation by the Consumers Association of Canada indicates that the benefits of this technology are starting to be recognized," CCA said in its Action News publication. Support from the industry, government, the scientific community and the medical profession will be required to support consumer education initiatives.

"The arguments advanced by opponents of irradiation today are almost identical to those used at the start of the last century against milk pasteurization. The benefits of pasteurization and irradiation are also similar to the extent that some have advocated that the term 'cold pasteurized' be used instead of the term 'irradiated' on packaging."

Canada does allow irradiation of some products, including potatoes, onions, wheat, flour, whole wheat flour; and whole or ground spices and dehydrated seasonings. Read more here....
Irradiation process lets Cocanmex ship quality fruit to U.S; The Packer; Melissa Shipman (April 9, 2013):
Irradiated fruit can pave the way for tree-ripened mangoes in the U.S. market, said Roger Gay, chief executive officer of Cocanmex, Cuautitlan Izcalli, Mexico.
"We used to do the hot water bath, but with a 90- to 110-minute soak at 117 degrees, it just kills any flavor the mango could possibly have," Gay said.
Several years ago, Gay felt so strongly about the lack of quality and flavor with water-treated mangoes that the company stopped using the hot water bath treatment altogether and began focusing on shipping mangoes only to Europe and Canada, where the treatment is not required.
However, last year, when the Benebion irradiation facility in Matehuala, Mexico, was certified by U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors, Gay could again begin shipping mangoes to the U.S.
Read more here....
Irradiation to increase shelf life of India fruit; The Telegraph, Calcutta, India (April 10, 2013): 
Try using case studies, success stories, testimonials or examples of how others used your product or service successfully. Solicit material from clients and vendors, or ask your readers to write. It's a win-win! You get relevant content, and they get exposure.CALCUTTA, INDIA: Rays of hope are in sight to increase the shelf life of litchis from Muzaffarpur and Jardalu mangoes from Bhagalpur, India.

Scientists and officials attending a workshop in Patna on Tuesday stressed that the use of nuclear energy could go a long way to preserve fruits, much in demand in the state, and vegetables. Rays of hope are in sight to increase the shelf life of litchis from Muzaffarpur and Jardalu mangoes from Bhagalpur.

Scientists and officials attending a workshop in Patna on Tuesday stressed that the use of nuclear energy could go a long way to preserve fruits, much in demand in the state, and vegetables.

Bihar Agriculture University, Sabour, vice-chancellor (VC) M.L. Chaudhary said with irradiation technology, litchi can be preserved up to 48 days. Normally, the small luscious fruits are destroyed in three days. Similarly, he said, Jardalu mango from the Bhagalpur area can be preserved for 10 to 15 days against the usual three to four days. He added that the use of nuclear energy in agriculture could particularly help in the development of new varieties of seeds.

The workshop on the use of nuclear energy in agriculture, food and veterinary services was organised on the Bihar Veterinary College campus in Patna by the Sabour varsity. In attendance were officials from the Department of Atomic Energy and scientists from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (Barc), Mumbai.

KAP Sinha, joint secretary, department of atomic energy, said: "The use of irradiation technology in food processing can be of a great help. Litchis from Muzaffarpur and Jardalu mangoes from the Bhagalpur area can be exported to other countries where they are much in demand." He added that potatoes and onions can also be preserved for more than four to five months by passing them through gamma rays. 

Irradiated Tomatoes from Australia to New Zealand by June; SunLive; (May 5, 2013):

NEW ZEALAND: From June this year, irradiated Australian tomatoes and capsicums could be available in New Zealand retail outlets, cafes and restaurants. The Minister for Food Safety is due to make her decision on the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) proposal this month.

The Australian state of Queensland irradiates fresh produce, before it is exported, to prevent any bacteria or pests such as the Queensland Fruit Fly from leaving Australia's shores. The irradiation process uses electrical beams or X-rays, or gamma rays, which are generated from the radioactive source Cobalt 60. These processes are most likely to be used on tomatoes and capsicums coming to New Zealand from June.

"Irradiation is a vital tool to protect New Zealand's vulnerable horticulture industry from fruit fly and we support its use on at-risk produce from Australia," says Alasdair MacLeod, chair of Tomatoes New Zealand.
Read more here... 

Dangers of Mechanically Tenderized Beef; Consumer Reports via WGRZ-TV; (May 1, 2013):  

Before you fire up the grill for some great summer meals, Consumer Reports has a caution. The beef you buy may have been tenderized by machines - and that process can introduce potentially deadly bacteria into your food.
A sizzling steak on the grill looks tempting - but it may have been run through a machine to make it tender. The trouble is that sharp blades or needles can drive dangerous bacteria - including E. coli - from the surface of the meat into the center, where they're harder to kill.
That can increase health risks, especially for people who eat their meat rare or medium rare.
"The Centers for Disease Control has reports of four deaths and 174 illnesses in the past ten years caused by mechanically tenderized beef that was contaminated with harmful E. coli bacteria," said Andrea Rock of Consumer Reports.
You can't tell by looking if the beef has been run through a machine. The meat on the left was mechanically tenderized. The piece on the right was not. Read more here...
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Radura
FOOD IRRADIATION: A GUIDE FOR CONSUMERS, POLICYMAKERS AND THE MEDIA published by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) can be downloaded at Food Irradiation Book
IRRADIATED FOODS; published by the American Council on Science & Health Provides Science- provides science-based Information on food irradiation. The booklet can be downloaded at:IRRADIATED FOODS
Food Irradiation Principles and Applications
is an excellent source of information about food irradiation. For information go to:
Food Irradiation: Principles & Applications
FOOD IRRADIATION: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS is an excellent source of information on food irradiation.FOOD IRRADIATION: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
Food Irradiation Update is being sent to you by Ronald F. Eustice on behalf of the Food Irradiation Processing Alliance (FIPA) and the International Irradiation Association (iiA).
Ronald F. Eustice
Minneapolis, MN
USA

For more information on food irradiation visit http://www.fipa.us
Remember: Food irradiation is a cold pasteurization process that will do for meats, produce, and other foods what thermal pasteurization did for milk decades ago.
Sincerely,
Ronald F.  Eustice



 
 

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