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Food Irradiation Updates

  
Published by Ronald F. Eustice on behalf of the Food Irradiation Processing Alliance (FIPA) and the International Irradiation Association (iiA).
July  2013
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Food Irradiation Update is published monthly by Ronald F. Eustice, a food quality & safety assurance consultant based in Minneapolis and Tucson. He can be reached at: reustice@gmail.com and at 612.202.1016.
In 2002, Health Canada completed an exhaustive scientific review of an application to approve the irradiation of ground beef. This review encompassed an extensive range of considerations, including dose, efficacy, odour, appearance, shelf-life, composition, nutrition and toxicology. The conclusion of the scientific review was that: "Food irradiation can improve food safety by killing disease-causing bacteria such as E. coli and Salmonella" and no significant adverse consequences for the other factors were identified. More than a decade later and after many serious foodborne illness outbreaks, no action has been taken largely because of unfounded claims made by "fear mongering" special interest groups. Hopefully rationality will prevail and Health Canada will move forward with this long overdue approval.

 

IN THIS ISSUE
Canadian Cattlemen's Association hopeful irradiation petition will be approved
Food Irradiation in Asia, Europe and the United States: A Status Update
Questions & Answers with Dr. Richard Hunter, Food Irradiation Services Chief Executive
Does irradiation damage nutritional content of tomatoes? New Zealand experts respond
Impact of the Precautionary Principle on Feeding Current & Future Generations
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
QUICK LINKS
Canadian Cattlemen's Association hopeful irradiation petition will be approved, Manitoba Cooperator; (June 25, 2013):
WINNEPEG, MB: The waiting has begun all over again for the Canadian Cattlemen's Association (CCA) as it renews efforts to persuade Health Canada to approve irradiation for beef. The CCA submitted paperwork in early May asking the federal agency to restart the approval process for beef irradiation in Canada, repeating a similar request in a 1998 petition.

Then, the association sought irradiation as an option for fresh or frozen ground beef in its final packaging for the control of E. coli 0157:H7. However, this time, the petition is for all types of beef products so that its use can be expanded to other beef products, said Mark Klassen, director of technical services with the CCA. Read more here....

View Canadian Meat Council Website here...

Food Irradiation in Asia, Europe and the United States: A Status Update; By Tamikazu Kume and Setsuko Todoriki (May 2013):

This paper reviewed the status of food irradiation in Asia, the European Union, and the United States in 2010. Results of the study show that quantities of irradiated foods in Asia, the EU, and the US in 2010 were estimated at 285,200, 9,300, and 103,000 tons, respectively. Compared with 2005, the quantity of irradiated foods was 100,000 tons higher in Asia and 10,000 tons higher in the US but 6,000 tons lower in the EU. Thus, commercial food irradiation has increased significantly in Asia and shown moderate but steady growth in the USA during the 5-year period studied. Phytosanitary irradiation of fruits and agricultural products has recently increased with 6 countries having irradiated 18,500 tons in 2010. Based on actual market experience, phytosanitary irradiation is expected to increase significantly in the future.

Setsuko Todoriki is Research Leader, Food Safety Division, National Food Research Organization of Japan. The above article is reprinted from RADIOISOTOPES; Vol. 62, No.5 May 2013).
Read more here... 
Questions & Answers with Dr. Richard Hunter, Food Irradiation Services Chief Executive; The Ledger, (June 3, 2013):
Richard Hunter has plenty to be proud of these days. His irradiation services company, Mulberry-based FTSI, is posting record revenues and Hunter was named a 2013 "Face of Technology" by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The 61-year-old Oklahoma City native joined FTSI in 2001 as the firm's chief executive. He previously served as the deputy state health officer for the Florida Department of Health.

Hunter is a graduate of Oklahoma State University and earned his masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Oklahoma. He lives near Valrico with his wife, Marcia, and has two adult children.

Does irradiation damage nutritional content of tomatoes? New Zealand experts respond; Posted in Science Alert: (May 9, 2013):

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND:  Recent media attention has focussed on irradiated Australian tomatoes and capsicums which could be imported into New Zealand soon, subject to approval by Food Safety Minister Nikki Kaye.According to Food Safety New Zealand, irradiation of food is undertaken in 50 countries and is used to "destroy bacteria and pests and to extend the shelf life of food".

While irradiated food poses no health risks to consumers, does the irradiation process destroy the nutrient content of food? The Green Party MP Steffan Browning told the New Zealand Herald that irradiated tomatoes should not be imported into New Zealand because the irradiation process destroys vitamins and other nutrients in them. The Science Media Centre asked scientists for comment. Dr Peter Roberts, ionizing radiation expert and independent consultant and Dr Sophie Walker, scientist, National Radiation Laboratory comment: Read more here... 

Impact of the Precautionary Principle on Feeding Current & Future Generations; (June 24, 2013):  

The Council on Agricultural Science & Technology (CAST) has released a new Issue Paper, Impact of the Precautionary Principle on Feeding Current and Future Generati
ons
, that looks at the history of the precautionary principle (PP) and examines problems of ambiguity, arbitrary application, and bias against new technologies. Because the publication is especially focused on the need to feed a growing population, the case studies center on agricultural issues such as pesticide use, genetically modified foods, and food irradiation.
Read more here...
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Radura
FOOD IRRADIATION: A GUIDE FOR CONSUMERS, POLICYMAKERS AND THE MEDIA published by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) can be downloaded at Food Irradiation Book
IRRADIATED FOODS; published by the American Council on Science & Health Provides Science- provides science-based Information on food irradiation. The booklet can be downloaded at:IRRADIATED FOODS
Food Irradiation Principles and Applications
is an excellent source of information about food irradiation. For information go to:
Food Irradiation: Principles & Applications
FOOD IRRADIATION: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS is an excellent source of information on food irradiation.FOOD IRRADIATION: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
Food Irradiation Update is being sent to you by Ronald F. Eustice on behalf of the Food Irradiation Processing Alliance (FIPA) and the International Irradiation Association (iiA).
Ronald F. Eustice
Minneapolis, MN
USA

Phone: (612) 202-1016
E-mail: reustice@gmail.com 
For more information on food irradiation visit http://www.fipa.us
Remember: Food irradiation is a cold pasteurization process that will do for meats, produce, and other foods what thermal pasteurization did for milk decades ago.
Sincerely,
Ronald F.  Eustice


 
 

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